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MIMM - Medical Instruments and Materia Medica

Object Type: Folder
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Title
Description
Date

Medical bag and equipment belonging to Patrick Brangan. Patrick Brangan qualified as a doctor in 1927, he was Assistant Master of the Coombe Hospital from 1928 to 1931. On the death of his father Dr John Brangan, in 1913, he returned to Kells and practiced as a GP until his death in 1977.

1900-1999

Rectangular wooden case containing part of one curved thermometer, designed by Sir William Aitken and produced by L Casella and Company, London. Presented by Dr Dawson. This one displays a Fahrenheit temperature scale. The bulb that was placed under the armpit is broken and missing. The scale appears in intervals of 10, starting at 80 degrees and ending 119 degrees. The manufacturer's mark is written in cursive on it along with the number 8827. This particular thermometer was intended to be read in situ, hence the curved shape, making it easier to be read while self-administering. Also missing from this box is the straight thermometer. This thermometer did not need to be read immediately in situ, and could be removed and read at a later time. The inner lid of the box displays informaton such as the contents, directions for both thermometrs and general remarks.

1850-1899

Burrows' type stethoscope, in three parts. The stem can be separated by unscrewing the central portion, and then screwing on the stem mount (here, broken). It is an abnoramlly long example.

1850-1899

Carved ivory exploring trochar and cannula. The head of the object can be screwed off to reveal metal opening for needle insertion. The lower portion of the object can also be screwed off to reveal a silver needle, about 55mm long.They were used in 19th century surgery to drain fluids or gas in order to relieve any pressure build-up. The object has two concentric lines carved into roughly the centre, which ultimately separate the two parts that can be unscrewed. The number 2 is marked on this central portion.

1850-1899

Percussion hammer, created by Carl Reiner and presented by William Geoffrey Harvey. Object has a flat, possible vulcanite handle which leads to a metal head. The face has a (now deteriorated) rubber end, allowing for softer contact with the patient. Wintrich style hammer.

1900-1949

Clinical thermometer and cedar wood case. Temperature readings are displayed in degrees Fahrenheit, starting at 85 degrees and ending 114 degrees. No manufacturer's mark on either the thermometer or case. The case unscrews at one end.

1900-1949

Round pocket-watch style clinical surface thermometer, presented with its red textile-lined case by Dr E MacDowel Cosgrave. The thermometer itself is small, with its glass face showing both degrees celsius and fahrenheit. The number 15305 features at the bottom of the face, with a "F" indicated in the lower central portion. The fahrenheit temperatures appear in intervals of 10, starting at 70 and ending at 110, while degrees appear in intervals of 5, starting at 20 and ending at 45 degrees. The object has a looped handle for attachment. Used by placing the back of the thermometer on the surface of the skin and observing the hand on the face move to the appropriate number. Still in working order.

1850-1899

Cylindrical ivory travelling pill box, belonging to physician Charles Philip Croker, presented by Dr Geoge Peacocke, 10 June 1915. The cylinder is split into 5 unequal parts that can be unscrewed. Excluding the cap, pills can be stored in the remainding four compartments, with each one inscribed with the medication intended to be stored there. They read, from top to bottom: Pil. Submer; Pil Aper (probably referring to laxatives); Pil Hydra (possibly referring to blue mass, a mercury-based medicine); Pil Ant J (possibly antimony) .

1825-1875

Set of exploring trocars, set in four sizes in oval metal handles, made of stainless steel. Handle can be unscrewed to reveal the various size of trocars and cannulae. Manufacturer's mark cannot be seen as the surface has slightly faded at one end. Trocar-cannulas were originally used to relieve pressure from fluid or gas build-up. Similarly they could also be used in post-mortem embalming. Presented by Dr J Monaghan, from his father's personal GP kit.

1900-1949

Very narrow and hollow body, curved out. One end tapers out, with rounded rim. Oval loop present on this tapered end. Kramer's-type eustachian catheter. Marked "2" on the larger end. Unknown maker.

1900-1949

Small rectangular case containing 4 ophthalmic surgical instruments, and 1 tweezers. Instruments are held in place by screwed-in metal, allowing for each instrument to be separately stored. The handles are made of thin ivory, whereby the metal heads are slotted about 20mm into the handle. The tweezers is not held in place and is loosely fitted into the box. The inner box itself is lined with red fabric. There is no apparent manufacturer mark.

1850-1899

Roughly cube shaped scarifactor made of brass, presented by William Geoffrey Harvey. On the base appear four parallel lines which present small individual blades once the lever on the top of pushed to the opposite side. Beside this lever is a knob that can be twisted to adjust the height of the overall object, and subsequently the height of the blades. The scarifactor claimed to be a less painful bloodletting technique, by creating multiple cuts simultaneously with narrow blades and quick punctures to the skin, The patent for the scarificator was awarded to George Tiemann in 1834. This particular example was made and sold by Thompson & O'Neill, located at 7 Henry Street, Dublin.

1850-1899

Wooden box consisting of 6 ivory-handled scalpels and two loose needles, presented by Dr G Bewley. The 6 scalpels are individually set in the box with metal mounting supporting the base of the handles and the need of the blade. Each scalpel blade is of a different size, with equal sized handles. The blades are set about 20mm into the handles. The inner lid of the box has a hidden compartment that can be lifted to reveal two, now empty, spaces intended to store scissors. The box is brass-bound and intended to be locked. At the bottom of the box a red and white price label is present with handwritten price "£330".

1850-1899

Clinical thermometer in black case. Thermometer readings are displayed in degrees Fahrenheit, starting at 90 degrees and ending at 110 dgrees. The font has slightly faded, as has the manufacturer's mark on the reverse side. The top of the case is square in shape

1875-1925

Vulcanite monaural stethoscope designed by William Stokes. Black vulcanite consisting of narrow stem with tapering earpiece. Bowl-shaped end. Very lightweight.

1850-1899

Presented by Mr R Lane Joynt, in 1916. Round pocket-watch type clinical surface thermometer, made by Maw London and presented by Mr R Lane Joynt, 23 February 1916. The face shows temperatures in both degrees fahrenheit and celsius. The celsius markers appear in intervals of 10, starting at 4 and ending at 50. The fahrenheit markers appear in intervals of 10, starting at 44 and ending at 114. The number 1059 appears just above the manufacturers mark at the lower portion of the face. It works by placing the back of the thermometer on the surface of the skin and observing the hand on the face move to the appropriate temperature. Unlike other examples, this object is without a case, but does have a round attachment at the top, with a small circular perforation to allow for attachment.

1850-1899

Small ivory pleximeter, or plexor made by Arnold & Sons presented by Dr Geoffrey Bewley in December 1946. The object is presented in its case, lined with dark purple satin and velvet, which opens by pushing the small button. Object's manufacture mark is slightly faded. Object itself consists of a cylindrical stem, with two concentric lines one third of the way down. Both ends flare out to a completely flat surface. One end is slightly bigger than the other. Object is lighweight.

1875-1925

Long wooden Laennec stethoscope. His kind was the first true stethoscope, which were used until the later part of the Nineteenth century. The stethoscope can be separated into two parts by pulling apart from the central portion of the cylinder.

1800-1850

Portable binaural stethoscope made by Fannin Ltd., owned by Dr. Geoffrey Bewley. Tubing extends from chest piece to eartips, meaning it is completely flexible. Black rubber tubing is in poor condition and is deteriorating. Diaphragm is circular, with two metal stems extending from the upper portion, leading directly into the two rubber stems. Eartips are probably made of ivory.

1900-1949

Presented by Mr R Lane Joynt, in 1916. Rectangular wooden case containing two thermometers, designed by Sir William Aitken and produced by L Casella and Company, London. There is one larger curved thermometer, displaying a Fahrenheit temperature scale. The scale appears in intervals of 5, starting at 80 degrees and ending 116 degrees. The manufacturer's mark is written in cursive on it. This particular thermometer was intended to be read in situ, hence the curved shape, making it easier to be read while self-administering. Also in the box is a straight thermometer. Unfortunately, the bulb that is placed directly on the skin has broken off and is missing. Again, the temperature scale is in Fahrenheit, appearing in intervals of 10, starting at 80 degrees and ending at 112. The manufacturer's mark is also present on the object. This thermometer did not need to be read immediately in situ, and could be removed and read at a later time. The inner lid of the box displays informaton such as the contents, directions for both thermometrs and general remarks.

1850-1899

Long stainless steel artery forceps, produced by Fannin Ltd., used at the Coombe Maternity Hospital, Dublin. Oschner's, curved type. Central ratchets can be locked and unlocked to ensure safety. Transfered from PMEC obstetrical training equipment

1925-1975

Enema set, displayed in a book-like box titled "Morning Exercise", presented by Prof T Henry Wilson. There seems to be a missing part, possibly another nozzle. Present parts include a white metal nozzle, brass and white metal tube, a textile hose,and a brass and ivory syringe. The case is lined and the overall condition of the case is poor. The lock has been broken, including part of the edge of the inner rim.

1850-1899

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